The 4 Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss

The first time I heard about The 4 Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss was through Alex and Mimi Ikonn, Entrepreneurs/Influencers that I have enjoyed following online for many years. This is one of the things that Alex said when recommending The 4 Hour Workweek that made me realize it had to be on my reading list:

The 4 Hour Workweek – it’s actually a very special book to me. It’s probably the single most important book in my life, that has changed my life the most. – Alex Ikonn

So, last Christmas I added it to my wishlist (which mostly consists of books and fluffy socks)- and much to my delight, I got the book!

Now that I have a few weeks off (Read about my new chapter in life here) I finally got a chance to read The 4 Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss, and I am now excited to share with you a review of this read.

First of all, for those of you who haven’t heard about this book before, here’s a brief run-down of what it’s all about.

The 4 Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss

Forget the old concept of retirement – there is no need to wait and every reason not to. Whether your dream is escaping the rat race, experiencing high-end world travel, earning a monthly five-figure income with zero management, or just living more and working less, this book is the blueprint.

Who doesn’t want to work less and live more?

This book covers a lot of ideas and concepts; So much so, that explaining them in depth would make this the longest blog post ever. So, I will list some of my favourite topics from the book in point form, and if these seem like topics that would interest you, then I suggest you grab a copy of the book.

  • How has being ‘realistic’ or ‘responsible’ kept you from the life you want?
  • Dreamlining: Applying timelines to your wildest dreams
  • Define what you want to do with your time, then free your time to do it
  • Define what would be the worst-case-scenario, and find out what you would do to overcome it.

Named must your fear be before banish it you can. -Yoda (Star Wars)

  • The reasons why doing the unrealistic is actually easier than doing the realistic
  • Decreasing the amount of work you perform while increasing your revenue. Replacing yourself with Automation, which permits Liberation.
  • Pareto’s Law (The 80/20 Rule) i.e. 80% of your results come from 20% of your effort and time, etc.
  • Parkinson’s Law: A task will swell in perceived importance and complexity in relation to the time allotted for it’s completion. (Giving yourself shorter deadlines increases productivity and reduces overwhelm).
  • Training those around you to be effective and efficient with your time. (Only replying to your emails once per day, giving end times to meetings, etc.)

 

  • Outsourcing the tasks that are the most time consuming or cause you the most stress. (Getting a personal virtual assistant- for pretty much anything)
  • Building a business where you can earn passive income “Income Autopilot”
  • Finding your muse, choosing your niche (Reselling? Creating?)
  • Asking questions, finding mentors

There are a million ways to make a million dollars.

  • Ways to propose working from home (A big topic in The 4 Hour Workweek)
  • Asking for forgiveness afterwards is easier than asking for permission before
  • Learning how to get past “no”/rejection
  • The excuses we tell ourselves to avoid quitting terrible jobs that make us miserable
  • The art of letting small bad things happen in order for big great things to happen

Once you realize that you can turn off the noise without the world ending, you’re liberated in a way that few people ever know.

  • Mini Retirements – Taking extended time off throughout your working life, rather than saving it all up for when you’re 65+ (How-To, Resources, Etc)
  • Case studies of all types of people who have successfully used the tools from The 4 Hour Workweek and are now living happier than before

The part of The 4 Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss that hit home the most for me was a section about “Filling the void” – Adding life after subtracting work.

Because I recently stopped working my serving job, I am now faced with much more free time than I am accustomed to. Tim addresses that it is normal to have doubts that invade the mind when there is nothing to fill your time. Ferriss adds that having goals and a focus will fill the void, which I am now doing with music and my blog. Reading this chapter came at the perfect time for me.

In addition to all of these topics, Tim also shares a ton of stories about his life and others that pertain to this way of living. I definitely have a favourite story from The 4 Hour Workweek, but it is fairly long so I will share it in an upcoming blog post.

What are my overall thoughts about this book?

This isn’t a book for everyone, it is a book for people with a certain mindset, who feel unhappy with the “conventional” 9-5 lifestyle. That being said, that has always been me since I was a little girl and decided I wanted to be a singer.

This book is for people who want to change their life, by finding more time and money to pursue their passions/dreams.

Or course, not every story or situation rang true for me. However, this was a great read that provoked a lot of thought. I learned some valuable lessons for sure that I am excited to implement into my lifestyle.

If this sounds like a book for you, I will leave the link to purchase The 4 Hour Workweek below. I am an Amazon affiliate, so if you do purchase, I may make a small commission at no extra cost to you.

SHOP NOW: The 4 Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss

The 4 Hour Workweek

Thank you for reading about this New York Times #1 Best Seller. I hope you have enjoyed learning about The 4 Hour Workweek by Timothy Ferriss and all that this great read has to offer!

Have you read this book before, or would you be interested in reading it? Let me know in the comments below!

Feel free to follow me on     Instagram     Twitter     Pinterest !

Related Posts:

Book Review: The Artist’s Way by Julia Cameron

Why I Don’t Believe in Having A Back-Up Plan

 

Advertisements